The U.S. travel ban has been blocked in court and in federal court, but it has been put on hold indefinitely, the Justice Department said on Thursday.

The administration’s decision was based on a legal argument that a “state of emergency” existed in place, and that the executive order violates the Constitution.

A judge temporarily blocked the order from taking effect on March 2, and a second judge has blocked the ban from taking place on March 5.

As of Friday, about 6.6 million people have been granted permission to enter the United States.

President Donald Trump said on Twitter on Thursday that the ban was not an executive order, but rather an emergency measure meant to protect the nation from an imminent threat.

“A federal judge has ruled that the Executive Order on Travel Ban is not an emergency.

We will fight for our borders &c.

Thank you,” Trump tweeted.

U.

S Attorney General Jeff Sessions said on Friday the order is legal and he is continuing to enforce it.

But the State Department said it would take “extraordinary measures” to protect U.C. Berkeley and other international sites from the ban, which it said would have “severe and immediate consequences.”

“These measures include not only the imposition of heightened security requirements for entry, but also increased screening and screening checkpoints for visa overstays, increased inspections of international arrivals, and heightened security in the United Nations and the world community,” the department said in a statement.

While the State Dept. said it was “very confident” that “the ban is lawful, we cannot predict what, if any, impact it will have on U.N. and international travel or on our partners or partners’ ability to participate in the global community.”

The Trump administration had argued in court that the order was necessary to protect Americans from terrorism and other threats because it was not “targeted” enough to prevent citizens from entering the United State.

Attorney General Jeff Flake, a Republican, said the administration should appeal the decision.